One of the lessons people learned from the Great Depression had to do with accepting strangers. Jim Sheridan shared that when he rode railroad boxcars to get around during the Depression, there would be 50 or 60 people in a car, discussing politics and sharing meals. How can public transportation be a means for relationship-building and dialogue?

Access to parks and recreation areas for leisure time physical activity and mental health is rapidly evolving. The Center for Disease Control released updated guidelines for visitors and administrators to prevent and support social distancing and safe, clean facilities. Submitted by Ingrid Schneider, University of Minnesota (ingridss@umn.edu)

Parks

United States


Photo credit: Ingrid Schneider

Peavey Field Park, in a diverse section of the city, stands in stark contrast to parks like Lake Harriet. With limited seating and smaller trees, it is not as inviting to neighbors. Parks are crucial for health and well-being, particularly in highly impacted neighborhoods of communities of color.

Parks

Twin Cities, Minnesota


Photo credit: Tasoulla Hadjiyanni

As Adam Grant, reknown organizational psychologist at the Wharton noted on a LinkedIn post, “if you’re working from home, the pandemic has extended the average work day by 2-3 hours.” He called for testing out 6-hour work days or 4-day work weeks. Urban parks, such as Lake Harriet, offer an invitation to people to stop and rethink their priorities and how they spend their time and energy.

Parks

Twin Cities, Minnesota


Photo credit: Tasoulla Hadjiyanni